Trisha Taurinskas

Trisha Taurinskas

Enterprise crime reporter

Trisha Taurinskas is an enterprise crime reporter for Forum Communications Co., specializing in stories related to missing persons and unsolved crime. Her work is primarily featured on The Vault.

Trisha can be reached at ttaurinskas@forumcomm.com.

A key piece of evidence in this case stemmed from the discovery of Pamela Dunn's engagement ring.
When a person goes missing, law enforcement is often stuck in a problematic position. Without a body, it can be difficult to prove a crime existed. That means justice, however obvious it may seem, is often not achieved. For the 2001 missing persons case of Pamela Dunn, that’s not exactly the story.
On May 17, 1981, Karla Jo Nieland was found dead inside a vehicle belonging to her boyfriend, John Keep. Authorities arrested Keep and charged him with second- and third-degree murder — one year later, a jury found him not guilty. The case remains open.
Investigators continue to monitor advances in DNA technology — including the expansion of DNA databases — in the hopes of revealed answers. Yet by all accounts, the case has gone cold, leaving Anita Knutson’s family and friends in a perpetual state of disbelief and uncertainty.
In the months and years leading up to her daughter’s disappearance, Mary Schabot watched Rachel Cyriacks struggle through the realities of an abusive relationship — the ups and downs and the unsuccessful attempts by loved ones to help her get out.
The majority of missing persons cases are solved, yet many families and friends continue to wait, day after day, for their loved ones to be located.
While search teams have worked diligently to cover the 140-square mile area of interest, there has been resistance by some landowners to allow access to search parties, including those associated with Emergency Support Services, an organization based in Minneapolis that provides assistance in search and rescue operations.
Brian Guimond said he does have a theory as to what happened to his son, but at this point, he’s tight-lipped. He does believe the truth will come out — although, he doesn’t believe it will be the result of the investigation currently being handled by the Stearns County Sheriff’s Office.
The search to piece together evidence and find the 29-year-old preschool teacher's killer has led investigators and those close to Alicia Hummel down a tumultuous road of dead-ends and unanswered questions.
The true crime docuseries and documentaries struck a chord among true crime aficionados, contributing to the success of the genre and propelling new cases into the spotlight.