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THE SORTING PEN

Jenny Schlecht reflects on the little irritants on a farm, like the dust from pushing cattle or unloading corn and how it can affect parts of day-to-day life.
Jenny Schlecht ponders the continuing legacy of her husband's great-grandmother, whose recipe continues to be used to raise thousands of dollars for good causes and whose progeny show up to help in the efforts.
The smell of the ranch in the fall is far more than just the manure; it's all the comforting things that farm kids grow to associate with home.
"I know 125 years isn't a long time in the whole scope of human history, but it's pretty impressive for this part of the world. What's more impressive to me is that the town hasn't just stayed alive but has recently found new and interesting ways to stay lively."

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As the summer waned, Jenny Schlecht thought she had won the battle against garden pests and looked forward to a feast of sweet corn. The area raccoons made sure to let her know that she was wrong.
It can be hard for farmers and ranchers -- and in particular those with livestock -- to truly take a break. But getting away makes you better at what you do.
The peach crops from the south have been slow because of a variety of weather problems, Jenny Schlecht learned. It was a good reminder that farming isn't easy whether you've got wheat fields or orchards.
Listening sessions are underway for a new farm bill. What needs to be there and what doesn't?
Helping a child prep for the county fair -- and then actually making it through the fair -- can help the adults in their life get in shape. But the County Fair Workout is one that only works for a limited time.
"The cool, dreary May meant that we kept pushing back our planting until it was a good week or two past the point we would have liked to have seeds and plants in the ground. But the weather warmed up, and we certainly haven't been dealing with drought."

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Why did we report on a Bill Gates-associated company buying North Dakota farmland from Campbell Farms? Here are three reasons.
Jenny Schlecht describes how two calves on her farm needed milk replacer to stay alive.
"Last year at this time, when we already were watching the U.S. Drought Monitor turn redder and redder every week, we would have danced with joy to see even one of the storms we've had this year. But right now, at this minute, can it please stop?"

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