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AGRICULTURE

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Hunter Kvistad's farm in Yellow Medicine County is the site of a virtual tour on Nov. 22, 2022 –- two days before Thanksgiving -– as part of Minnesota Agriculture in the Classroom. Keri Sidle of Minnesota Agriculture in the Classroom said the organization has been visiting a turkey farm just before Thanksgiving every year since 2016. Minnesota is the nation's leading turkey producer and the turkey farm is the most popular of the virtual tours. Sidle expects more than 100 elementary classrooms from 12 to 15 states will participate.
The first two communities where Nature Energy will set up are Benson in central Minnesota and Wilson in the southeast. The company is working on plans for a third location in Roberts, Wisconsin, just across the St. Croix River from Minnesota.
Last winter's uncertainly on fertilizer inputs has subsided somewhat. Flexible or not, any lease is likely to reflect the strong prices for commodities and the demand for cropland.
American Farm Bureau Federation economists said despite the higher prices, there should be enough turkeys available for the Thanksgiving demand.
One of the most significant lessons my dad taught this farmer’s daughter was to lead by example.
LeRoy and Rosemary Helbling of Mandan, North Dakota, farm with International Harvester equipment that is mostly 30 to 40 years old, kept in pristine condition. They raise crops primarily as feed for their Hereford herd of cows.

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Multiple colleges in North Dakota and Minnesota are starting up meat cutting programs to try to help meet a demand for workers. Some of the first North Dakota State College of Science students are interning with a small-town meat locker as part of that program.
Jenny Schlecht reflects on the little irritants on a farm, like the dust from pushing cattle or unloading corn and how it can affect parts of day-to-day life.
Red Wing Grain, which typically loads 400-600 barges in a year and handles about 25 million to 30 million bushels annually through its facility, is down 10% to 20% this fall, said Jim Larson, general manager

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