Here is a quick round-up of some of our top stories this week as well as a peek at what to expect next week.


30 years after Terry Dorff murder in Fargo, former boyfriend and friends recall risks faced by gay community

Gerry Even, 55, of Fargo, dated Terry Dorff before Dorff's murder in 1991. The two met at a gay dance held at the old Regency Inn in Moorhead, now home to the Courtyard by Marriott, shown in the background. David Samson / The Forum
Gerry Even, 55, of Fargo, dated Terry Dorff before Dorff's murder in 1991. The two met at a gay dance held at the old Regency Inn in Moorhead, now home to the Courtyard by Marriott, shown in the background. David Samson / The Forum

FARGO — Gerry Even last saw his former boyfriend Terry Dorff alive 30 years ago at a gay dance in a hotel that's since been torn down.

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He remembers Dorff on the anniversary of his murder, and sometimes in between.

“I can't put it aside ... but I’ve tried really hard to not dwell on it,” Even said.


Money, sex and power: The 1963 murder of Carol Thompson by her attorney husband shocked the Twin Cities

T. Eugene Thompson, right, is arrested by St. Paul Detective Ernest Williams on June 21, 1963. In one of St. Paul's most celebrated murder cases, 34-year-old Carol Thompson was found beaten and stabbed to death in her Highland Park home on March 6, 1963. Later, her husband, T. Eugene Thompson, is convicted of hiring two men to murder her. Pioneer Press file photo.
T. Eugene Thompson, right, is arrested by St. Paul Detective Ernest Williams on June 21, 1963. In one of St. Paul's most celebrated murder cases, 34-year-old Carol Thompson was found beaten and stabbed to death in her Highland Park home on March 6, 1963. Later, her husband, T. Eugene Thompson, is convicted of hiring two men to murder her. Pioneer Press file photo.

When Carol Thompson was brutally attacked in her picturesque St. Paul home on March 6, 1963, the Twin Cities were shaken up. Her husband T. Eugene Thompson would eventually be convicted of conspiring the first-degree murder gone wrong.


He traded his badge for a microphone: Listen how one ex-cop is seeking justice with a true crime podcast

Jamie Pultz is the creator and host of Beenham Valley Road, an Australian podcast that investigates the tragic death Kirra McLoughlin / photo courtesy Six 10 Media
Jamie Pultz is the creator and host of Beenham Valley Road, an Australian podcast that investigates the tragic death Kirra McLoughlin / photo courtesy Six 10 Media

When the wheels of justice run too slowly, the public can become frustrated. Sometimes law enforcement lose patience with the system, too. When an Australian cop learned that a victim of domestic violence had died and nothing was being done about it, he turned in his badge to seek justice with a microphone.


Q&A with crime reporter Hannah Shirley

Hannah Shirley
Hannah Shirley

Meet Hannah Shirley. Hannah is the crime reporter for the Grand Forks Herald. She's also been a barista, a receptionist, a video store clerk, a knives salesperson, a host in a swanky sports bar, and a pizza maker

Q. Describe an average day in the life of a crime reporter?

A. My day usually starts by catching up on police call logs, jail rosters, daily court schedules and any press releases local law enforcement sent out overnight. . .


Coming next week

Monday: What's it like to be a real-life crime reporter? Forum Communications reporters share their experiences

Tuesday: The Vault looks into the missing person case of Lucia Perez. Perez went missing on June 27, 2011, after she traveled from Worthington, Minn., to Iowa with another male to seek employment. Lucia has not been seen or heard from since.

Wednesday: Dakota Spotlight host James Wolner interviews Eric Carter-Landin host of True Consequences podcast.

Thursday: In the waning days of Prohibition, North Dakota made national news as being home to one of the biggest illegal bootlegging operations in the nation.