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Photos: Anglers, kayakers take to the Brule River

"Seems fitting for a warm Saturday afternoon, where folks were nowhere to be found in a car, one only needs to turn to the Brule River to find bustling activity," writes Jed Carlson.

Maddie Kraemer, left, looks back at her line as she gets ready to cast while Travis Johnson works a spot
Maddie Kraemer, left, looks back at her line as she gets ready to cast, while Travis Johnson works a spot under a downed tree near Douglas County Road FF, just north of the Lenroot Ledges on the Brule River on Saturday, July 9.
Jed Carlson / Superior Telegram
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BRULE — I was out for a drive Saturday, July 9, and found myself out on the Finish Freeway — also known as Douglas County Road FF for those of you not from the area.

It had been a solid 20-25 minutes since I had seen another vehicle. I started slowing down as I coasted down a slight hill while I neared the bridge that crosses over the Brule River.

Travis Johnson works a shallow spot on the Brule River
Travis Johnson works a shallow spot on the Brule River near the Douglas County Road FF bridge as kayakers wait in a group after navigating the Lenroot Ledges on Saturday, July 9.
Jed Carlson / Superior Telegram

Once over the water I came to a complete stop, still no cars in sight. I looked to the right. Nothing. No big surprise.

Then I turned my head to the left and caught a glimpse of two people out in the river. I pulled my vehicle into the fishermen’s parking lot and turned the car around. I parked and walked back to the bridge to grab a couple shots of the anglers fly fishing the River of Presidents.

As I make a few images, I notice color coming from the top of my viewfinder. It wasn’t color from the natural beauty of the Brule, it was a group of kayakers huddled together after making their way through the Lenroot Ledges. The kayakers eventually paddled past the duo fishing after they moved to the bank to share the river and a little piece of their afternoon.
After grabbing a few more shots as the kayakers moved through the quick flowing waters, I wandered down and talked a little with the pair fishing, Travis Johnson and Maddie Kraemer.

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“We just got here, but we’ve both caught some already,” laughed Johnson, a student at Lake Superior College.

Seems fitting for a warm Saturday afternoon, where folks were nowhere to be found in a car, one only needs to turn to the Brule River to find bustling activity.

Kayakers navigate some swiftly moving water on the Brule River
Kayakers navigate some swiftly moving water on the Brule River on Saturday, July 9.
Jed Carlson / Superior Telegram
Maddie Kraemer takes a break from fly fishing as she walks over to the bank of the Brule River
Maddie Kraemer takes a break from fly fishing as she walks over to the bank of the Brule River as a group of kayakers paddle by on Saturday, July 9.
Jed Carlson / Superior Telegram
A group of kayakers make their way down the Brule River
A group of kayakers make their way down the Brule River towards the Douglas County Road FF bridge on Saturday, July 9.
Jed Carlson / Superior Telegram
Travis Johnson reels in a catch as he fishes on the Brule River
Travis Johnson reels in a catch as he fishes on the Brule River on Saturday, July 9.
Jed Carlson / Superior Telegram
Travis Johnson works a spot under some downed trees
Travis Johnson works a spot under some downed trees near Douglas County Road FF along the Brule River on Saturday, July 9.
Jed Carlson / Superior Telegram
ayakers make their way down the Brule River under a low tree in some quick water
Kayakers make their way down the Brule River under a low tree in some quick water on Saturday, July 9.
Jed Carlson / Superior Telegram
Travis Johnson grabs for his catch as he fishes on the Brule River
Travis Johnson reaches for his catch as he fishes on the Brule River near Douglas County Road FF on Saturday, July 9.
Jed Carlson / Superior Telegram
MORE FROM JED CARLSON:
Dramatic lighting at recent wrestling match forced photographer Jed Carlson to get creative.

Related Topics: FISHINGSUPERIOR
Jed Carlson joined the Superior Telegram in February 2001 as a photographer. He grew up in Willmar, Minnesota. He graduated from Ridgewater Community College in Willmar, then from Minnesota State Moorhead with a major in mass communications with an emphasis in photojournalism.
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