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GEORGE FLOYD

As part of his federal plea agreement, Chauvin will serve his state and federal sentences at the same time in federal prison.
Jury selection in the case was set to begin June 14. Opening statements were slated for July 5.
By entering the plea on Wednesday, now-former officer Thomas Lane avoided an upcoming trial on the more serious charge of aiding and abetting second-degree murder.
Chauvin pleaded guilty Dec. 15 to violating Floyd's civil rights. He will serve his federal sentence concurrently with his prison time from his state conviction in Floyd’s murder.

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In the appeal filed in Minnesota Court of Appeals on Monday, his lawyers raised 14 separate issues, including Judge Peter Cahill's decision to deny Chauvin's request to move the trial out of Hennepin County, which includes Minneapolis, because of the intense pretrial publicity.
Chad McGinty, a former law enforcement officer who worked on the review, described a breakdown of "critical" communication among government agencies during the unrest that left first responders with "limited" guidance as they fielded calls during the chaos and resulted in an inconsistent police show of force.
J. Alexander Kueng and Tou Thao were accused of failing to intervene on Floyd's behalf as he pleaded for his life and repeatedly said he couldn't breathe while pinned under the knee of former Officer Derek Chauvin's knee for more than nine minutes. Along with Thomas Lane, Kueng and Thao were also charged with a second count of violating Floyd's rights by failing to render aid during the restraint captured on a bystander video that fueled global unrest and a racial reckoning.
The jury's closed-door discussions began shortly before 10 a.m. and ended at 5 p.m. Lunch was provided to them in the deliberation room so they were able to work without a break. The 12-person, all-white panel was expected to return for more discussions at 9 a.m. Thursday.
Attorneys for prosecution, defense deliver closing arguments
Ex-cop Thomas Lane takes the stand in federal civil rights trial; closing arguments Tuesday

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The shooting in Brooklyn Center triggered multiple nights of protests in the Minneapolis suburb, capturing national attention at a time many Americans were reckoning with racism and police violence.
J. Alexander Kueng said he tried to act as a conduit between Chauvin and then-officer Thomas Lane, who asked repeatedly whether George Floyd should be turned on his side. Kueng, though, admitted he never asked Chauvin to turn Floyd over himself but echoed Chauvin’s response to “just leave him.”
Kueng, 28, took the stand in St. Paul's federal courthouse Wednesday, speaking publicly for the first time in the trial against him and two other former officers charged with depriving Floyd of his civil rights during the fatal encounter.

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