You may have noticed that there are a growing number of businesses, organizations, and local and state governments urging Congress to take action to address the climate emergency. So how do we, the voting public, help encourage action?

The key is to get the attention of our members of Congress. What we, the public, care about is important to them. After all, we are their constituents, the people who vote for them (or not). Our members of Congress take notice of activity back home. Passing local municipal endorsements that support action on climate change is one way to make a big impact.

These important attention-getters are powerful because they not only represent thousands of constituents, but they give a green light for legislators to support bills on climate action.

The bipartisan, grassroots organization Citizens’ Climate Lobby has worked with municipalities across the country to pass resolutions in 135 local governments and seven tribal entities in support of the Energy Innovation and Carbon Dividend Act (energyinnovationact.org).

In Wisconsin, there are presently 23 resolutions endorsing some level of climate action. Here in our 7th Congressional District, there are nine municipal endorsements of the Energy Innovation and Carbon Dividend Act.

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Here are some of the ways that citizens of Wisconsin can get involved to help create the political will needed to protect our livable world. You can work with city or county governing boards to sponsor a resolution. Talk to your local board members about your concerns and desire to introduce a climate resolution endorsing effective legislation such as the Energy Innovation Act.

Ask your friends and neighbors to help by meeting with elected officials in your community and explaining your concerns.

Check out community.citizensclimate.org/resources/item/19/143 for more ideas and helps to get a resolution on the agenda of your local government. That’s the first step in getting the attention of those who need to hear from lots of us back home.

Linda Herscher,

Birchwood, Wisconsin