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LETTER: Taking issue with column on wealth

To The Telegram: Bernie Hughes' guest editorial of April 15, "Democracy not well served with wealth in hands of just a few," begs the question, "in what country, upon which planet does he dwell?" If he reads, he certainly knows that the federal g...

To The Telegram:

Bernie Hughes' guest editorial of April 15, "Democracy not well served with wealth in hands of just a few," begs the question, "in what country, upon which planet does he dwell?"

If he reads, he certainly knows that the federal government caused the current financial disaster by encouraging, even coercing, irresponsible mortgage lending to unqualified borrowers. Insufficient wealth redistribution is not the problem, as Mr. Hughes implies.

Were wealth redistribution the solution to fending off financial disaster, we would be disaster-free. Over 50 percent of the $3 trillion spent annually by the federal government is directed to social redistribution programs. But apparently for some, their appetite for wealth redistribution is bottomless. Recall that Karl Marx was a big fan; his ideas, flaming failures.

According to Mr. Hughes' sources, in 2006 wealth was concentrated in a small percentage of the population. May he find solace in the recent stock market meltdown which unwound much of that concentration. But, if Bill Gates and Warren Buffet came by their fortunes honestly, through wise invention and wise investing, what concern is that of his?

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And why does he believe that the government has the right to confiscate and redistribute more of their money?

Rather than wasting his energy fomenting envy, perhaps Hughes could refocus his efforts on things that enable people to achieve their dreams. Education and jobs come to mind.

Education is the great equalizer, yet President Obama and Congress hypocritically slammed the door on education vouchers for children of low income families in Washington D.C. "Yes we can" condemn children to dangerous, under performing public schools.

Perhaps Mr. Hughes could fight the public education monopoly that is failing many children by advocating for school competition and parental choice, for alternatives such as vouchers and charter schools.

On jobs, he could fight to eliminate taxes and regulations that discourage business development and hiring. Embarrassingly, the U.S. corporate income tax rate is one of the world's highest. And, President Obama, the man who supposedly cares about Mr. Hughes' "working stiffs," has vowed to destroy coal mining and the coal-fired utility industry by regulating them out of business.

"Yes we can" is President Obama's rallying cry and "yes he will" if given the chance. These things destroy jobs and impoverish families.

Let's get beyond the destructive, counterproductive politics of envy and start focusing on the things that actually improve people's lives.

-- Wayne C. Anderson,

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