ADVERTISEMENT

ADVERTISEMENT

Dorin won’t be forgotten

Janna Stevens I first met Dr. Patrick Dorin in 1989, when bringing my son to school at Blaine Elementary. Dorin was out front most every morning to greet the children and parents. If you had the time to stop and chat, he would share a story about...

Janna Stevens

 I first met Dr. Patrick Dorin in 1989, when bringing my son to school at Blaine Elementary. Dorin was out front most every morning to greet the children and parents. If you had the time to stop and chat, he would share a story about the railroad or the importance of education.

I recall one conversation about the “old Ericsson School.” Ericsson was only a few blocks from my home at the time. I was saddened to see it demolished and worried about losing the neighborhood school feel. Pat shared that even though my “close” neighborhood school was gone, Blaine had excellent staff that would take great care of my son. He reassured me that I would feel Blaine was my neighborhood school.

He was right. Both of my children had excellent teachers and I value the education they received in their elementary years.

Since that first meeting, our lives crossed paths many times.

ADVERTISEMENT

Most recently, he was one of my seven Board of Education members. He sat right next to me at the Board table and stopped in to visit every week. Dr. Dorin always had a story to share, a kind word of encouragement, and a “mythical hug” to get me through the week.

I will miss him … I already do.

Many others have shared memories of Dr. Dorin. I’ve captured a few below.

A former student from Nelson Dewey shared how Dr. Dorin was known for his “silent cheer.” He would stand in the front of our classroom and count to three in Japanese. He and the entire class would then wave their hands wildly in the air, while remaining completely silent. Perhaps Dr. Dorin was trying to quiet a loud group or build the climate? The result was a lasting memory.

A former colleague and neighbor shared that Dr. Dorin was serving as principal of both Lincoln and Nelson Dewey when I had the pleasure of working with him. He was a kind and gentle man that was full of positive energy. The students loved to hear his stories about Japan and the railroad. Pat always sent me a “virtual hug.” Something many people may not know about Pat is that he was the “daily walker in the East End of Superior.” Dr. Dorin rarely missed a day of exercise.

A current Board member shared: I had the opportunity to travel to a CESA conference with Patrick when I first became a Board member. Due to Pat’s careful driving habits, we took longer than usual to get to our Hayward destination. The ride did give us a chance to talk about family, school, Japan and of course trains. When we arrived, I remember watching Pat work the room. He gave and received many hugs. Dr. Dorin had a big heart!

Dr. Patrick Dorin is a man to be remembered.

Janna Stevens is the administrator for the School District of Superior.

ADVERTISEMENT

 

What To Read Next