Superior’s Parks and Recreation Commission is starting the process to name the new trail that runs from Bear Creek Park to Wisconsin Point Road.

The trail would have two names: “Makwa Ziibiins Miikana,” the Ojibwe words for “Bear Creek Trail.”

According to the city’s naming policy, park and recreational facilities can be named for geographical, geological or historically significant features in the area.

“I am working with Fond du Lac, and at this time they are looking to see if the creek is historically known as Bear Creek or if there is a historic name for the creek,” said Linda Cadotte, parks, recreation and forestry director.

A sign welcomes hikers to the Bear Creek Trail near Bear Creek Park Monday, Sept. 28. (Jed Carlson / jcarlson@superiortelegram.com)
A sign welcomes hikers to the Bear Creek Trail near Bear Creek Park Monday, Sept. 28. (Jed Carlson / jcarlson@superiortelegram.com)

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If it turns out the creek was known by a different name, she said the name of the trail might have to be adjusted.

Cadotte said she was still waiting for the final word after receiving two responses to go ahead with the name as presented.

Under the naming policy, the name for the trail — which has been informally called the Bear Creek Trail — has to be open for public comment for a minimum of 60 days before it is finalized.

Parks and Recreation Commissioner Gene Rosberg questioned what would happen if the name of the trail turned out to be different from the proposal.

Leaves rest on the wooden boardwalk on the Bear Creek Trail Monday, Sept. 28. (Jed Carlson / jcarlson@superiortelegram.com)
Leaves rest on the wooden boardwalk on the Bear Creek Trail Monday, Sept. 28. (Jed Carlson / jcarlson@superiortelegram.com)

Cadotte said it would be up to the commission to determine whether the change was significant enough to warrant holding the public comment period open longer.

During the permitting process, culturally significant sites in the area of the trail were discovered.

“There’s some real significance to the Ojibwe culture in the area,” Cadotte said.

Construction of the new trail should wrap up by the end of October, she said, and a celebration of its completion would happen in November.