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3 new cases of COVID-19 in northwestern Wisconsin on June 28

Two counties in the 10-county region reported new cases of COVID-19 Sunday.

FSA Coronavirus local
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Douglas and Taylor counties reported new cases of COVID-19 on Sunday, June 28, according to the state Department of Health Services .

Douglas County reported two new cases, while Taylor County reported one new infection. The increase in cases comes as 7.1% of the total tests reported Sunday came back positive, DHS figures show.

Statewide, there were 27,743 positive cases of COVID-19 Sunday, an increase of 457 cases from the day before.

No additional people died from COVID-19, leaving the total number of deaths in the state at 777.

The number of negative tests in the state was 521,747, an increase of 6,024 from the day before.

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Here's a breakdown of the situation in the 10-county region:

Ashland County

  • Active cases: 1
  • Deaths: 0
  • Total cases reported since pandemic began: 3
  • Total negative tests: 739

Bayfield County

  • Active cases: 0
  • Deaths: 1
  • Total cases reported since pandemic began: 3
  • Total negative tests: 1,047

Burnett County

  • Active cases: 2
  • Deaths: 1
  • Total cases reported since pandemic began: 3
  • Total negative tests: 830

Burnett County last reported a positive case of COVID-19 on Saturday, June 27.

Douglas County

  • Active cases: 4
  • Deaths: 0
  • Total cases reported since pandemic began: 24
  • Total negative tests: 2,158

Iron County

  • Active cases: 3
  • Deaths: 1
  • Total cases reported since pandemic began: 5
  • Total negative tests: 350

Iron County last reported positive cases of COVID-19 on Saturday, June 27.

Price County

  • Active cases: 0
  • Deaths: 0
  • Total cases reported since pandemic began: 2
  • Total negative tests: 885

Rusk County

  • Active cases: 2
  • Deaths: 0
  • Total cases reported since pandemic began: 11
  • Total negative tests: 735

Sawyer County

  • Active cases: 3
  • Deaths: 0
  • Total cases reported since pandemic began: 12
  • Total negative tests: 1,764

Sawyer County last reported new cases on Friday, June 26.

Taylor County

  • Active cases: 9
  • Deaths: 0
  • Total cases reported since pandemic began: 12
  • Total negative tests: 975

Washburn County

  • Active cases: 1
  • Deaths: 0
  • Total cases reported since pandemic began: 4
  • Total negative tests: 1,090

Washburn County last reported a positive case of COVID-19 on June 19.
Of the people statewide who have tested positive for the new coronavirus, 12% — or 3,393 people — have been hospitalized because of the virus as of Sunday. DHS reported that officials don't know the hospitalization history of 8,162 people, or 29%.

Sunday's report also showed that 79% of those with confirmed cases have recovered from the illness.

Wisconsin's daily testing capacity was 18,425 on Sunday. An increase in the number of tests being done is one reason for the increase in the number of positive cases. The percentage of positive tests over the last several days was:

  • 3.8% on Monday, June 22
  • 2.2% on Tuesday, June 23
  • 4.3% on Wednesday, June 24
  • 4.1% on Thursday, June 25
  • 5.7% on Friday, June 26
  • 5.9% on Saturday, June 27
  • 7.1% on Sunday, June 28

All of Wisconsin's 72 counties have confirmed cases of the illness.

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Related Topics: CORONAVIRUSHEALTHALL-ACCESS
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