ADVERTISEMENT

ADVERTISEMENT

Wolf disagreement could cause a delay of delisting

The Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources is raising concerns about a federal finding that there are two distinct wolf populations in the state. The issue could affect a proposal to take the grey wolf off the endangered species list.

The Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources is raising concerns about a federal finding that there are two distinct wolf populations in the state. The issue could affect a proposal to take the grey wolf off the endangered species list.

This spring, when the Fish and Wildlife Service announced the proposed delisting of the grey wolf in the western Great Lakes region, the service added a new wrinkle. Agency scientists said two species of wolf may be in Wisconsin, the gray wolf and the eastern wolf.

But DNR endangered resources official Rebecca Schroeder (SHRO-der) says the state believes the two wolves act as one. She says the DNR sides with those who believe the eastern wolf is only found as a pure species in southern Ontario, and that genetics from that population long ago mixed with Wisconsin's wolves.

The DNR has just filed testimony with Fish and Wildlife, endorsing the proposed delisting of the grey wolf in the Great Lakes region.

But the Center for Biological Diversity has just sent fish and wildlife a letter saying the group remains opposed to removing federal protections for the gray wolf. The center's Noah Greenwald says the genetics work on the gray and eastern wolf is still not settled.

ADVERTISEMENT

Greenwald also says his group remains concerned with how Wisconsin would reduce its population of gray wolves, to roughly half the 800 animals the DNR estimates there are in the state.

A federal decision on delisting is expected by the end of the year.

What To Read Next