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Wisconsin DMV begins new voter ID training for workers

Laurel White Wisconsin Public Radio Wisconsin's Division of Motor Vehicles rolled out a new training process Tuesday to get employees up to speed on Wisconsin's voter ID law. The training comes after last week's allegations that DMV employees hav...

Laurel White

Wisconsin Public Radio

Wisconsin's Division of Motor Vehicles rolled out a new training process Tuesday to get employees up to speed on Wisconsin's voter ID law.

The training comes after last week’s allegations that DMV employees have provided people incorrect information about getting free state ID cards for voting.

"We still have plenty of time to right any wrongs that may have occurred," said Kristina Boardman, DMV administrator, after testifying before lawmakers Tuesday.

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About 400 employees are expected to complete the online training by Friday, Boardman said. Employees will also have one-on-one meetings with their supervisors about the voter ID procedures, including a petition process for individuals who can't easily obtain the documents needed to get an ID.

Last week, VoteRiders, a national organization providing voter education, released a set of audio recordings they have said were taken at Wisconsin DMVs. The recordings show some DMV employees providing bad information about getting voting credentials for November's election, organization officials have said.

Shortly after the recordings were released, a federal judge ordered the state to investigate the allegations.

On Tuesday, state Department of Transportation Secretary Mark Gottlieb said he still believes the process for issuing free state IDs is effective.

"We believe that the process is a sound process that will certainly not disenfranchise any voter," he said.

Results of the investigation are due to federal judge James Peterson by Friday.

More WPR news is available on KUWS-FM 91.3 or wpr.org.

Wisconsin Public Radio, © Copyright 2016, Board of Regents of the University of Wisconsin System and Wisconsin Educational Communications Board.

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