ADVERTISEMENT

ADVERTISEMENT

Warden, landowner teamwork shows in illegal deer kill case

By Joanne M. Haas DNR Bureau of Law Enforcement DNR Conservation Wardens Bob Jumbeck and JJ Redemann say if it wasn't for the early-morning actions of a concerned Buffalo County landowner, a troubling case involving at least 40 illegally killed d...

By Joanne M. Haas

DNR Bureau of Law Enforcement

 

DNR Conservation Wardens Bob Jumbeck and JJ Redemann say if it wasn’t for the early-morning actions of a concerned Buffalo County landowner, a troubling case involving at least 40 illegally killed deer in a few sparsely populated townships might never have been solved.

“The biggest thing about this case is how important it was to get that information from the citizen – being able to work with the community,” Jumbeck says of the case that came to light in December 2014. But this case had been building for months.

ADVERTISEMENT

The overnight shooting had been echoing in the night skies for a while before Jumbeck got the call from the Buffalo County Sheriff’s Department about a citizen tip concerning suspected poachers. That was Dec. 14.

“The citizen had heard multiple shots and then saw several vehicles go by,” he said of the tip that led him to the landowner. “He ( landowner) documented the license plate – and that’s what led us to the individuals.”

Jumbeck responded after getting the Dec. 14 call from the sheriff's department while dispatch went to work on identifying who owned the license plate documented by the landowner. It turns out the suspect vehicle owner lived within the city limits of Mondovi. The next step? Jumbeck contacted the Mondovi Police Department, which in turn sent one of their officers to the suspect's residence.

“The officer was able to make contact with two occupants prior to my arrival, which really helped,” Jumbeck said, adding he spotted a dead doe once he arrived at the suspect's home. And there were two suspects: an adult and a juvenile.

Jumbeck learned the doe had been shot from the road around 2 a.m., but not the same location where the landowner had heard shooting and saw a license plate. It was at this point when Jumbeck then called in Warden Redemann, who covers northern Buffalo County and nearby Pepin County, to help with the case. They began compiling the evidence and documenting the deer the two suspects shot from the road during a period that lasted several months.

“Most of the deer killed were not harvested, but shot and left to lay and die,” Redemann said.

Word of the case traveled in the Buffalo County area which the wardens say is populated by those who take ownership of the resources and its conservation. It is a county known far and wide among hunters and wildlife observers for its abundance of mature white-tailed deer.

But, the wardens stress, what the two suspects did in this case bore no resemblance to hunting, and instead robbed from ethical hunters and wildlife observers of this valuable state natural resource.

ADVERTISEMENT

“When deer are shot for the thrill of it and left to lie – that strikes a real chord with people," Jumbeck said, noting the wardens view the public as their partners in protecting the resources for all. “This case is a great example of how one person stepped up and started this whole process. You have to remember that the shooting wasn’t just happening on one landowner’s road – it was spread out in 2 to 3 townships.”

The adult suspect was sentenced to 45 days in jail with a 6-year revocation of all hunting, trapping and fishing privileges, plus 100 hours of community service and $3,740.55 in fines. The juvenile was processed through juvenile court proceedings.

If you have information regarding natural resource violations, call or text: VIOLATION HOTLINE: 1-800-TIP-WDNR or 1-800-847-9367. The Hotline is in operation 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. Trained staff relay reported information to conservation wardens. Anyone who calls the Violation Hotline or provides information can remain anonymous.

What To Read Next