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Vets head to DC on 10th Honor Flight

Lisa Kaczke Forum News Service Northland veterans will spend Saturday visiting military memorials in Washington, D.C. as part of the 10th Honor Flight Northland. Organizer Karin Swor hopes as many people as possible will gather at the Duluth Inte...

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Visitors, including Honor Flight Northland veterans, tour the World War II Memorial in Washington, D.C. in 2011. (file / News Tribune)

Lisa Kaczke

Forum News Service

Northland veterans will spend Saturday visiting military memorials in Washington, D.C. as part of the 10th Honor Flight Northland.

Organizer Karin Swor hopes as many people as possible will gather at the Duluth International Airport to welcome the veterans, who are expected to return between 9:30 and 10:30 p.m. Saturday. Community members can gather on the lower level of the airport.

While in the capital, the veterans will visit the National World War II Memorial, the Women In Military Service for America Memorial, Arlington National Cemetery, Vietnam Veterans Memorial and the Korean War Veterans Memorial. The group will also watch the changing of the guard and lay a wreath at the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier.

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Saturday's Honor Flight will include 17 World War II veterans and 22 Korean War veterans, and the remainder are Vietnam War veterans.

It's also an emotional day for the veterans, remembering their war experiences.

"For a lot of veterans, they're putting a closure to their wartime because they don't talk about their wartime," she said.

This is Honor Flight Northland's 10th trip to Washington, D.C. Swor, whose father served in the South Pacific with the U.S. Navy during World War II, said she still becomes emotional on each trip.

"It's the most amazing thing in my life. You're crying, you're laughing. I started doing this because my dad was very, very active in the veterans community. He wanted to go to DC so bad and I never got him there. I look up and go, dad, I'm taking your friends. It's very touching to me," she said.

Swor said as long as they can raise funds for more Honor Flights, they'll continue to take veterans to Washington, D.C. The trips are free to veterans and open to all veterans, but priority is given to World War II and Korean War veterans because of their age, she said.

 

 

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