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SPD shares introductions, honors with community

New officers, promotions, outstanding service to the community - it's just a fraction of the work the Superior Police Department does in a year. And Friday, the department shares some of those achievements with the community as well as introduces...

Lear

New officers, promotions, outstanding service to the community - it's just a fraction of the work the Superior Police Department does in a year.

And Friday, the department shares some of those achievements with the community as well as introduces new officers to the people they'll serve.

This year, the department introduces three new officers to the community and celebrates the promotion of one of its officers during the annual Law Enforcement Ceremony at 4 p.m. Friday in the Government Center Boardroom.

New officers include Eric Olson, a Brooklyn Park, Minn., native who earned a bachelor degree in criminology and political science at the University of Minnesota Duluth, and graduated from the Fond du Lac Tribal and Community College's law enforcement program and Jennifer Orn, who grew up in Barnum, Minn., and graduated from the law enforcement program at the tribal and community college and still serves in the Minnesota Air National Guard. Both officers were hired in August and completed recruit training Nov. 19 and are now in the Superior Police Department's field training program.

Officer Sean Holmgren of Pike Lake, Minn., a former member of the U.S. Air Force and graduate of the University of Minnesota Duluth with a bachelor's degree in criminology and computer science, started with the police department Monday and just started basic recruit training. Holmgren's wife Amy will stand in for him at Friday's ceremony.

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"As a department that exists to serve and protect the community, we have felt that it's important that the community knows who we are as an agency and the outstanding work that our officers do," said Superior Police Chief Floyd Peters. "We want to introduce new officers to the community that they'll be serving, recognize any promotions and share the work that officers have done."

This year, police also celebrate the promotion of one of their own - Bill Lear was promoted to sergeant last spring. Lear had worked part-time deputy with the Douglas County Sherriff's Department, part-time officer in Solon Springs and an officer with the Fitchburg, Wis., police department before joining the Superior Police Department in 2005.

Peters recognizes the honors given at Friday's awards ceremony are just of a fraction of the work officers have done in the last year.

This year's ceremony includes honors for officers who have taken the initiative on investigations, shown high levels of self-directed patrol work and even risked their safety to protect the safety of others. Some will even be recognized for aid they provided in communities outside of Superior because they happened to be there when an incident occurred.

The honorees, selected by their peers in the police department, will be announced Friday at the annual ceremony.

"A lot of the things done by our officers are never known to the community unless they happen to see something or read something in the newspaper," Peters said. "So it's a good way for us to reinforce the importance of law enforcement in our community, to give some credit in a thankless job."

Peters said he likes it that families of the officers have the chance to realize that the community and police department care about the officers who serve Superior.

"Day-in day-out, without law enforcement, it would be anarchy in our community and our nation, and we are the protectors and defenders of the community," Peters said. "There's a lot at stake and it's a noble profession. You don't have to look too far with this weekend's tragedy in Arizona to see it's a delicate balance to try to do this protection of the community."

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Related Topics: CRIME
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