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New rules still being written for gun training courses

The Wisconsin Department of Justice says to be wary of gun training courses claiming to meet the rules of the new concealed carry law, because those rules haven't been written yet.

The Wisconsin Department of Justice says to be wary of gun training courses claiming to meet the rules of the new concealed carry law, because those rules haven't been written yet.

Act 35, Wisconsin's concealed carry law, goes into effect Nov. 1, but the rules that will be used to implement it are still being drawn up by the Department of Justice. Brian O'Keefe is administrator for Law Enforcement Services at DOJ. He says people should be cautious when looking for a concealed carry training course before the law takes effect.

"I know there are a lot of people saying, 'My course will meet all the rules.' The rules have not been written or approved yet, so that's not the case," O'Keefe says. "And it may well be that they will eventually meet all the rules it's just that we don't know what they are yet."

But Bill Schmitz, owner of BDJ Limited in Redgranite, a company that offers concealed carry training, says those are administrative rules that cannot be more restrictive than the guidelines laid out in the state law. He says Act 35's training standards are extremely low and his courses will easily qualify.

"We're offering training right now for Utah and Florida and since Utah and Florida both train to a higher standard than what is required by Wisconsin's legislation," Schmitz says. "We feel very strongly that the classes we do for Utah and Florida will be good for Wisconsin as well."

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If the DOJ's rules end up including something his training does not cover, Schmitz says he'll make it right, free of charge.

"If we have to do something different we'll get them together, we'll get it done and get them on their way," he says.

The Department of Justice says the rule making process will be completed by Oct. 15, so they can be approved by lawmakers and published by the Nov. 1 deadline.

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