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Report: Judge accepts Derek Chauvin plea deal in civil rights case

Chauvin pleaded guilty Dec. 15 to violating Floyd's civil rights. He will serve his federal sentence concurrently with his prison time from his state conviction in Floyd’s murder.

Derek Chauvin booking photo, April 20, 2021. (Photo courtesy Minnesota Department of Corrections)
Derek Chauvin booking photo, April 20, 2021.
Minnesota Department of Corrections
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ST. PAUL — Former Minneapolis police officer Derek Chauvin will be sentenced to 20 to 25 years in prison, under a plea agreement accepted by the judge overseeing the federal civil rights cases for four officers in the killing of George Floyd.

The Associated Press reported on the terms of the plea agreement on Wednesday, May 4.

Chauvin pleaded guilty Dec. 15 to violating Floyd's civil rights. He will serve his federal sentence concurrently with his prison time from his state conviction in Floyd’s murder.

Three other officers — J. Alexander Kueng, Tou Thao and Thomas Lane — were found guilty on all federal civil rights charges related to Floyd’s killing. They are awaiting sentencing on those charges.

Kueng, Thao and Lane are scheduled to go on trial in state court next month on charges of aiding and abetting Chauvin in Floyd’s murder.

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Chauvin on May 25, 2020, kneeled on Floyd’s neck for more than 8 minutes, killing him. The incident, caught on video by a bystander, galvanized the U.S. police reform movement, set off a wave of protest, and culminated in Chauvin’s widely viewed trial.

Related Topics: DEREK CHAUVINGEORGE FLOYD
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