ADVERTISEMENT

ADVERTISEMENT

Minnesota State Patrol pilot injured when duck crashes through helicopter’s windshield mid-flight

The pilots were able to continue flying to the St. Paul airport, and emergency medical services and troopers provided medical aid to the injured pilot.

duckhelicopter1.PNG
A Minnesota State Patrol pilot was injured when a duck went through a helicopter’s windshield Wednesday evening, May 18, 2022 the State Patrol said.
Courtesy / Minnesota State Patrol via St. Paul Pioneer Press
We are part of The Trust Project.

A Minnesota State Patrol pilot suffered a suspected head injury when a duck crashed through the windshield of a helicopter during a flight, according to information released by the State Patrol Thursday.

The pilots were able to continue flying to the St. Paul airport, and emergency medical services and troopers provided medical aid to the injured pilot. The pilot was transported to Regions Hospital with non-life threatening injuries, and was treated and released.

The State Patrol is assessing damage to the Bell 407 helicopter.

The helicopter and pilots were returning after providing assistance to law enforcement in Wabasha County who requested help about 10:15 p.m. Wednesday.

______________________________________________________

This story was written by one of our partner news agencies. Forum Communications Company uses content from agencies such as Reuters, Kaiser Health News, Tribune News Service and others to provide a wider range of news to our readers. Learn more about the news services FCC uses here.

What to read next
Minnesota is set to become an island in the region for abortion access and providers said that nonprofit clinics alone might not be able to handle all patients seeking services.
The top priority for Minnesota anti-abortion groups following the overturning of Roe v. Wade is winning elections in November. But even with the state Legislature and governor's office, passing sweeping bans could be a far reach.
Officials identified the case through initial testing at the state public health laboratory on Saturday. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention is working on final confirmation.
Regardless of how bad individual years are, the Minnesota Department of Health is not as concerned with year-to-year trends as it is concerned with the big picture over time, said agency tick disease specialist Elizabeth Schiffman.