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Make a Difference in Your Community

Talk to your neighbors. Encourage a supportive spirit among parents in your community. Mentor a new parent in your neighborhood. Check in often with a new parent. Sometimes just holding or changing the baby will allow a new mom or dad to finish a...

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Talk to your neighbors. Encourage a supportive spirit among parents in your community.

Mentor a new parent in your neighborhood. Check in often with a new parent. Sometimes just holding or changing the baby will allow a new mom or dad to finish an errand or take a few minutes for themselves.

Be a friend to the parents that you know. Offer to babysit, run errands or lend a friendly ear.

Keep your neighbors safe. Distribute materials to educate and support families Let families know that you support the love, devotion and healthy discipline they offer their children. Offer information and tips about the developmental milestones.

Be a good role model by setting a good example.

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Be active in your community. Developing playgroups for new families at community centers, libraries or schools ultimately contributes to the well-being of children.

Volunteer your time. Spend time mentoring a child, or start a family program of your own.

Call or write your elected officials. Ask your representatives to support funding and legislative initiatives for parent support

Remember... Anything that supports the children, parents, grandparents and caregivers in your community helps strengthen families.

  • Offer to baby-sit free of charge, so parents can get a break.
  • Arrange an on-going weekly or bi-weekly meeting with another mother (or a small group of mothers) so that mothers can talk over experiences or problems, while children play together.
  • If you are a grandparent, take care of a different grandchild each week to relieve some pressure on their parents.
  • If you are a supervisor, encourage and support flex and comp-time arrangements so parents may deal with day-to-day situations and children's emergencies without the added stress of repercussions at work.
  • If you are a preschool teacher, establish informal monthly meetings for parents of young children to provide information on parenting and schooling.
  • Canvas members of a social club and seek people available to provide babysitting for children under two years of age.
  • Be a good listener for the parents you have contact with. Let them talk about their trials and triumphs.
  • If you are a doctor or work at a doctor's office, locate and distribute positive literature on children's health issues and activities.
  • Work with the PTA to bring a parenting class to school and offer babysitting for parents who may otherwise be unable to attend.
  • Offer rides to neighborhood children's activities.
  • Volunteer as a big brother or club leader to help out kids and allow parents some free time.
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