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Homegrown Music Festival potentially linked to COVID infections

Festival organizers recommend attendees at any shows get tested for COVID-19.

Homegrown Music Festival focuses on West Duluth Wednesday evening
A disco globe sends specular yellow light everywhere as Max Mileski, left, performs with Sadkin during the Homegrown Music Festival on Wednesday, May 4, 2022 at Clyde Iron Works in Duluth.
Clint Austin / Duluth News Tribune
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DULUTH — "Several" positive cases of COVID-19 have been reported in attendees of the Duluth Homegrown Music Festival, organizers announced on social media Thursday. Everyone who attended a show May 1-8 is recommended to get tested for COVID.

"We wish a speedy recovery to those who may have got the virus during festival programming," the Homegrown team wrote in the social media post.

Cases of COVID-19 have been rising in the Northland, according to the Minnesota Department of Health, with 488 new positive cases reported in St. Louis County between May 7 and 12. Cases reported by the Minnesota Department of Health do not include at-home tests.

According to St. Louis County Public Health data, 345 cases were reported this week in Duluth. This is the highest total seen since mid-February. St. Louis County averaged about 200 positive cases in the previous two weeks.

Among positive cases is Duluth Mayor Emily Larson, who announced Wednesday she planned to self-isolate and cancel upcoming event appearances due to COVID exposure and symptoms. She wrote on Twitter that she received a positive test result confirming her infection on Thursday.

Our newsroom occasionally reports stories under a byline of "staff." Often, the "staff" byline is used when rewriting basic news briefs that originate from official sources, such as a city press release about a road closure, and which require little or no reporting. At times, this byline is used when a news story includes numerous authors or when the story is formed by aggregating previously reported news from various sources. If outside sources are used, it is noted within the story.
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