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Commentary: Jauch Statement on Bush Administration Denial of SeniorCare Waiver

The decision to kill a successful program that provides easy access to meaningful prescription drug relief for seniors, while saving federal tax dollars, is another outrageous example of the chronic stubbornness and hubris of the Bush Administration.

The decision to kill a successful program that provides easy access to meaningful prescription drug relief for seniors, while saving federal tax dollars, is another outrageous example of the chronic stubbornness and hubris of the Bush Administration.

SeniorCare costs less, provides a greater benefit and is far simpler to use. But true to form, the President and his subordinates have refused to admit that there is a better alternative, and have simply ignored the problems of their own program. It is vintage obstinacy from an Administration that cannot acknowledge that their policies don't work.

It is incredibly disingenuous for the Administration to lay blame on Wisconsin for not proving SeniorCare was budget neutral when the Congressional Budget Office acknowledged the vast savings associated with the program. This isn't a case where Wisconsin was negligent in any fashion--The President had already made up his mind that he would favor his program that provides favored status to pharmaceutical companies at the expense of citizens.

It galls me, and should offend any rational observer, that the President continues to pamper the pharmaceutical industry and at the same time stick a fork in the eye of seniors and taxpayers.

The ability for Wisconsin to negotiate lower drug prices through SeniorCare alone made it the superior program. I am disgusted with the President's decision to eliminate that benefit and force seniors to accept whatever price the pharmaceutical companies decide they should pay.

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Medicare Part D is complicated, costly and frustrating, while SeniorCare was not only cost-effective, but a marvel of simplicity. Indeed, it took me three months--with expert assistance--to help my mother wade through the Medicare Part D paper work, while my wife needed only 30 minutes to help her mother select a benefit through SeniorCare.

Why the Administration wishes to complicate the lives of seniors -- at the expense of taxpayers -- is beyond me.

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