A large-scale projection artist and another known for carting around his band of robots are behind an immersive pop-up art show that opens Wednesday and runs through Oct. 12 at the former Carlson Bookstore, 206 E. Superior St.

Embassy 35, according to its event page on Facebook, is “a space for off-beat designers, musicians, and visual artists to freely collaborate and dream up a next generation venue that caters to emerging art and technology; a place where we can redefine AWEsome (sic), a place where we can play with the future.”

“It’s a test concept for what could evolve into a larger idea,” said Troy Rogers, a science-minded musician who performs as Robot Rickshaw. “For now, it’s a work and play space — and also a place where we’re inviting other creators to come in and do something.”

Rogers and Daniel Benoit are behind the concept. The latter has worked in theater in addition to site-specific projections, including one that played across the Blacklist building during Homegrown Music Festival. The music lineup includes The Crunchy Bunch on Friday, Oct. 11, and Zeb or Zeke and the Run Away Screamings on Saturday, Oct. 12.

Embassy 35 is among a handful of local art exhibitions currently showing at local galleries/studios/spaces, ranging from “Art In Conflict: An Exhibition by the Museum of Russian Art” at the Tweed Museum to Swedish Folk Painting at the Nordic Center.

Dr. Robert Powless Cultural Center

AICHO

202 W. Second St.

Pat Kruse and Rabbett Before Horses Strickland, both from the Red Cliff Band of Lake Superior Chippewa, are the featured artists in “Mniidoos and Wiigwaas,” an exhibition that opens at 5:30 p.m. Friday, Oct. 11.

The show has paintings by Strickland. His work, influenced by European Renaissance and Baroque artists, tells the story of Nanabozho. Kruse is an award-winning birchbark and quillwork artist who creates basketry and also teaches. Exhibition runs through October.

"Minnesota Black Fine Art Show" courtesy of the Duluth Art Institute
"Minnesota Black Fine Art Show" courtesy of the Duluth Art Institute

Duluth Art Institute

506 W. Michigan St.

Now showing in the John Steffl Gallery at the art institute: “Minnesota Black Fine Art Show,” a juried traveling collection of pieces by new and emerging artists of African descent, including local favorites like Carla Hamilton (mixed media), Ivy Vainio (photography) and Terresa Moses (graphic design). This is on display through Jan. 2, 2020. Its Minnesota stops include Austin, Mankato, St. Cloud and Minneapolis.

Meanwhile, the George Morrison Gallery has “Jean: The Inspiration Behind the Birkenstein Arts Movement.” The works by the teacher-activist range from drawings to portrait work. Claudia Faith’s “Family,” in the Corridor Gallery, has colorful paintings of farm life.

Rachel Hayes and Eric Sall's exhibition "Affinities" is on view at the Joseph Nease Gallery. Image courtesy of Joseph Nease Gallery
Rachel Hayes and Eric Sall's exhibition "Affinities" is on view at the Joseph Nease Gallery. Image courtesy of Joseph Nease Gallery

Joseph Nease Gallery

23 W. First St.

It’s Rachel Hayes’ work in the window of the Joseph Nease Gallery, a multicolored draped piece that throws stained-glass like shadows on the floor when the sun is just right. Hayes and her husband, Eric Sall, have “Affinities,” a two-artist show, now at the privately owned gallery at 23 W. First St. “Affinities” is on display through Nov. 30.

Hayes and Sall live in Tulsa, Okla., with their children. Both are described as nationally-recognized, mid-career artists, and both are big, bold and bright with their work. Sall’s work is abstract and textured and unpredictable; Hayes is known for her installations, fabrics and layers that create light, shadow and movement.



Chris King's work is part of "Born to Kill" at UWS. Image courtesy of Kruk Gallery
Chris King's work is part of "Born to Kill" at UWS. Image courtesy of Kruk Gallery

Kruk Gallery

University of Wisconsin-Superior

Holden Fine Arts Center, Belknap and Catlin, Superior

Humor and art are on display during at the University of Wisconsin-Superior, with “Born to Kill,” an exhibition by John Sebelius and Chris King. The former is a nationally recognized artist whose reach has included Details magazine and “The Tonight Show with Jay Leno.” He was named Best Artist of 2017 by the people of Lawrence, Kan., and the Kansas City Chiefs made him featured artist for My Cause My Cleats in back-to-back years. King, meanwhile, is a Louisanna-based artist who works in painting, sculpture, performance and video. The artists will host a public workshop geared toward veterans from 2-4 p.m. Thursday, Oct. 10, at the Kruk Gallery. The opening reception is 5-7 p.m. Friday, Oct. 11. There will be a participatory comedy club as part of the installation.

Exhibition runs through Nov. 9.

The Nordic Center has a three-artist show of folk art. Image courtesy of the Nordic Center
The Nordic Center has a three-artist show of folk art. Image courtesy of the Nordic Center

Nordic Center

23 N. Lake Ave.

Three regional artists known for their Scandinavian aesthetic will show off Swedish folk paintings at an exhibition that has its opening at 5 p.m. Friday, Oct. 11, at the Nordic Center.

Judith Kjenstad, Pieper Fleck Bloomquist and Alison Aune are described as taking traditional Swedish art motifs and using them in contemporary work.

Kjenstad is behind a mural outside Ingebretsen’s Nordic Marketplace in Minneapolis. Bloomquist and Aune learned the traditional style in Sweden.

“Swedish Folk Painting: A Revival” is open weekends through Nov. 8.

"Collective Farm Harvest" is among the pieces at the Tweed Museum of Art.  Photo courtesy of the Tweed Museum of Art
"Collective Farm Harvest" is among the pieces at the Tweed Museum of Art. Photo courtesy of the Tweed Museum of Art

Tweed Museum of Art

University of Minnesota Duluth

1201 Ordean Ct.

“Art in Conflict” is a collection of 34 pieces, on loan from the Museum of Russian Art in Minneapolis, made between Stalin’s death in 1953 to the end of the Soviet era in 1991. The paintings, sculptures, etc., are a mix of political and social: So much Gorbachev, but also women at work. There is also a hammer and sickle sculpture and a touch of humor. This exhibition opens at 6 p.m. Thursday, Oct. 10, and includes curator talks by Maria Zavialova and Mark Meister, director of the Museum of Russian Art. Runs through Aug. 9, 2020.

Zeitgeist Arts Atrium

Zeitgeist Arts Building

222 E. Superior St.

Moira Villiard, among the most recognizable regional artists, has a show “Rights of the Child” now showing in the Zeitgeist Atrium. The paintings and posters consider the rights of children right now and the idea of “doublethink” — holding contradictory beliefs about an issue. Villiard is behind a bunch of public art, including the crosswalks project from this past summer and the mural of Chief Buffalo at Gichi-ode' Akiing, the former Lake Place Park.