ADVERTISEMENT

ADVERTISEMENT

Living a conscientious life makes its own luck

If we are conscientious, we are leading our life in a justifiable way. Many other terms describe it too, such as ethical, moral, honest, trustworthy, etc. Most of us follow the patterns we developed as we grew up.

If we are conscientious, we are leading our life in a justifiable way. Many other terms describe it too, such as ethical, moral, honest, trustworthy, etc. Most of us follow the patterns we developed as we grew up.

Michele Obama's brother, Craig Robinson, wrote a book entitled "A Game of Character" in which he tells of his family upbringing with years of conscientious training by good parents and kin. He also cites the high-principled people who he has worked for and with, who have helped him in every step along his life path. He is presently a successful basketball coach at Oregon State University but has had other successful life and work experiences. By the way, he made several speeches for his brother-in-law's presidential campaign.

The book and other articles on conscience made me think of my own life and how lucky most of us are to have had good parenting by caring and loving people, a good education by caring and competent teachers and work and social experiences too with conscientious, helpful people. Not everyone has that good luck. Craig would say, rightfully too, there was a good bit of hard work associated with the way that helped make one's good luck.

Reading the book caused me to examine critically my own life, behavior and the effects and affects of my conscience. One of my Poplar, Mont., Indian parents described conscience in a manner easy to remember. He said it is like a small tin can cover cut out with tin snips - sharp, ragged edges and all. Now that is implanted in your chest, like your heart, and the first time you do something wrong, it turns a bit and it hurts painfully, bothering you a great deal. Problem is, that if you keep doing the wrong things, that tin can cover will wear itself a path. After a long while, it will spin freely and you will not be bothered by conscience again. And we hear about those very few, people who go blissfully on their way doing bad things.

I, personally, am in the aging category now and looking back at life's experiences and thinking of the many, many people who have helped me along the way. Some I had the presence of mind and opportunity to thank, but many in the "hubbub" of life's pressures, were gone before I had the presence of thought and opportunity.

ADVERTISEMENT

In the May 3 issue of Newsweek magazine a Stephen Green ended a column titled, "Crisis of Conscience" concluding with words that I feel are extremely worth quoting:

"If we listen to the voice of conscience, it reminds us that something is owed by the affluent. This includes extensive giving, which should be at the level that is material for the giver. But no less important is the donating of time and talent. We have, after all, one life. And when it comes to how we spend it, the sayings are all true; you can't take your money with you, professional success (alone) doesn't make you happy, and you can eat only three meals a day."

Some readers will likely say: "But we aren't affluent."

Truthfully, most of us are in the present U.S.A. when compared to our own minority of poor and the world's larger portion of the poor and poverty-stricken. My conscience has compelled me to give back, materially, and to donate time and talent. I hope if you haven't done so in the past that you will begin, when able, to donate dollars to the worthy charity causes of your choice and contact the Retired Senior Volunteer Program, 1416 Cumming Ave or call 394-4425 to volunteer your time and talent. Marge Smith, coordinator, will be most pleased to sign you up, welcome you and help you determine where you could best help.

Any humor in this most serious subject?

With some people, a clear conscience is really just a poor memory.

To remove the conscience from some people would only be a minor operation.

What To Read Next