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KD's family opens restaurant in Superior

Third KD's location in former Breakwater building in Itasca

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Cassie Todorovich, zooms through the kitchen doors with a tray full of omelettes at the newest KD’s location, the former Breakwater Restaurant, in Superior on Thursday, Sept. 12. Todorovich worked at the Breakwater until it closed. (Jed Carlson / jcarlson@superiortelegram.com)

A new restaurant has moved into the former Breakwater Family Restaurant building in Superior’s Itasca neighborhood. KD’s (Kickin' Delicious) Itasca Bay Family Restaurant opened at 4901 E. Second St. on Saturday, Sept. 7.

The business features homemade breads, soups and sauces, salad bar, meat cut in-house, handmade-patty hamburgers and home-roasted turkey instead of deli cuts.

“This is about as homemade as you can get,” manager Lawrence Poster said.

It will also carry broasted chicken — the first batch was cooked up Wednesday, Sept. 11 — and offer $5 junior and senior meal options.

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KD’s is now open in the former Breakwater Family Restaurant building. (Jed Carlson / jcarlson@superiortelegram.com)

The Itasca eatery is Douglas County’s third KD’s restaurant. The Poster family — Amy, Lyle and their five children — purchased KD’s in Solon Springs in 2015. The initials stand for Kickin’ Delicious, they said. The family opened their second KD’s in a former Superior convenience store at 1706 Tower Ave. in January 2018.

“It’s been very successful,” Amy Poster said. “Lots of support from the people; the city’s been very supportive of us. Superior’s a great city to be a part of.”

Business was so good the family started exploring options to expand. They initially considered the former Old Town Bar on East Second Street. When the Breakwater closed in January, they seized the opportunity.

“We called (the owner) a week later and he was definitely interested in selling,” Amy Poster said.

They became owners of the building Aug. 30 and tore into deep cleaning.

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Sean Manley, brings out items for the Soup and Salad Bar at the newest KD’s location, the former Breakwater Restaurant, in Superior on Thursday, Sept. 12. Manley has worked in all three of the KD’s in the area. (Jed Carlson / jcarlson@superiortelegram.com)

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Some of the staff might also look familiar. A handful of former Breakwater employees have returned to the building to work for KD’s. Once the restaurant is fully staffed, it is expected to employ up to 20. Applications are being taken for cooks, dish washers and wait staff.

Even in the midst of its soft opening, traffic at the new restaurant has been steady.

“We’re doing almost the same amount of business as the Breakwater and we’re not even open at night yet so it’s been going good,” Amy Poster said.

By Friday, Sept. 13, the soft opening will be over and the business will add evening hours. The quick turnaround from empty building to bustling eatery took teamwork, and not just from the Posters.

“I think our family goes much further than that,” Amy Poster said. “We have an awesome team of people who are employed by us and they’re just all amazing people and I don’t think we could have the restaurants we have without them, to be honest with you, because you can’t do it alone. You need a good team and we’ve been blessed with that.”

KD’s Itasca Bay Family Restaurant will be open from 6 a.m. to 10 p.m. Monday through Saturday and 6 a.m. to 2 p.m. Sunday.

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KD’s owner, Lyle Poster, eats at the newest KD’s location, the former Breakwater Restaurant, in Superior on Thursday, Sept. 12. (Jed Carlson / jcarlson@superiortelegram.com)

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