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Jack Link inducted into second hall of fame

Jack Link's Protein Snacks founder will be recognized for business, civic engagement as a 2021 laureate in the Junior Achievement of Wisconsin Business Hall of Fame.

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A sign advertising Jack Link's beef jerky greets visitors on the edge of Minong. (File / News Tribune)
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For the second time this year, Jack Link of Minong will be inducted in a hall of fame.

The founder and chairman of Jack Link’s Protein Snacks will be formally inducted into the Junior Achievement of Wisconsin Business Hall of Fame on Wednesday, June 23, as a member of the class of 2021.

Link is one of four laureates to be recognized during an outdoor ceremony at Junior Achievement Kohl’s Education Center in Milwaukee.

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Jack Link

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Link, a lifelong resident of Minong, is being honored for his business innovation, effective management and civic involvement throughout the state. Under his leadership, Jack Link’s Protein Snacks has become one of the largest meat snack companies in the world, headquartered in Minong.

The induction ceremony, which supports Junior Achievement of Wisconsin’s K-12 educational programs, will be livestreamed at 4 p.m. Wednesday at wisconsin.ja.org .

In January, Link was inducted into the Meat Industry Hall of Fame as part of its class of 2020.

RELATED: Jack Link named to Meat Industry Hall of Fame

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Jack Link

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Jack Link

Related Topics: AGRICULTURE
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