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Graymont gigged for air pollution violations

Attorney General J.B. Van Hollen announced his office obtained a judgment against Graymont (WI) LLC, a limestone processing facility in Superior. The Douglas County Circuit Court judgment requires Graymont to pay $200,000 in forfeitures, mandator...

Attorney General J.B. Van Hollen announced his office obtained a judgment against Graymont (WI) LLC, a limestone processing facility in Superior.

The Douglas County Circuit Court judgment requires Graymont to pay $200,000 in forfeitures, mandatory court costs, and surcharges for violations of its Wisconsin air pollution control permits and Wisconsin's air pollution laws.

According to the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources (DNR), which issues air pollution control permits, the conditions in such permits protect public health by restricting emissions of chemicals that can affect respiratory health, particularly for people who are already sensitive to air pollution due to asthma, emphysema or other respiratory illnesses. Also, emissions of compounds such as sulfur and nitrogen dioxides contribute to acid rain, which can harm fish populations and have other harmful environmental effects. The permits contain both emission limitations, and emission testing requirements for sources to demonstrate compliance with those limitations.

According to the civil complaint, Graymont Western U.S. Inc. acquired the company that directly owns and controls the Superior limestone processing facility on Nov. 30, 2007, and ultimately changed the name of that company to Graymont (WI) LLC.

Graymont missed five of its required visible emissions tests between fall of 2004 and fall of 2006, formerly owned by the Duluth-based Cutler-Magner, and failed to report hydrogen chloride and carbon dioxide emissions in a timely manner between March 2005 and 2006.

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Graymont self-reported various violations of its air pollution control permits that occurred between 2005 and 2012 and failed various stack tests during the same period.

Specifically, Graymont fed limestone into a kiln at a rate greater than its permitted limit and exceeded sulfur dioxide, nitrogen oxides, carbon monoxide and particulate matter limitations at various kilns.

Assistant Attorneys General Bradley J. Motl and Cynthia R. Hirsch represented the State.

Judge George Glonek of Douglas County Circuit Court signed the order Oct. 10.

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