Sections

Weather Forecast

Close

Trial date set for former city councillor

A January trial date has been set for a former Superior city councilor who allegedly pointed a gun at his girlfriend while he was intoxicated during a domestic dispute.

Graham Franklin Garfield, 26, faces one felony count of first-degree recklessly endangering safety and misdemeanor counts of operate firearm while intoxicated, intentionally point firearm at person and disorderly conduct — all domestic abuse charges.

Citations for first offense operating while intoxicated and first offense operating with a prohibited alcohol concentration were also filed against Garfield in connection with the incident.

He was released on a $5,000 cash bond and ordered to have no contact with the reported victim, not consume alcoholic beverages and not possess any dangerous weapons.

A trial date of Jan. 23 was set for Garfield during a hearing Friday in Douglas County Circuit Court. A Jan. 5 pretrial conference was also set for Garfield.

According to the complaint:

Officers responded to a Banks Avenue residence at about 7:27 p.m. April 20 after a domestic dispute call was received from a third party; officers learned Garfield was the suspect, and he had left the residence prior to their arrival. He was located by the Douglas County Sheriff's Office in Pattison Park and taken into custody. A breath test indicated Garfield had an alcohol level of 0.164.

Garfield reportedly pointed a gun at the victim during an argument after drinking. Police later found the .22 mm pistol loaded with eight bullets at the Banks Avenue residence.

The alleged incident took place two days after Garfield was sworn in for his second term serving the city's 6th District.

Following Garfield's arrest and charging, there was a call from Mayor Jim Paine, other councilors and the public for him to resign. Garfield stepped down in May. Tylor Elm was appointed to the seat.

The most serious charge Garfield faces, the felony, carries a maximum penalty of 12 and a half years imprisonment and a $25,000 fine.

Advertisement
randomness