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Milroy, Jauch, introduce new Birth Certificate Bill

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Milroy, Jauch, introduce new Birth Certificate Bill
Superior Wisconsin 1226 Ogden Ave. Ste. 1 54880

Brad Phenow

Wisconsin Public Radio

A Birth Certificate Bill is in the process to give adoptees the ability to revert their birth certificates back to their birth parents.

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The bill has been introduced by Representatives Tom Larson, Nick Milroy, and Senator Bob Jauch. It’s already had a public hearing in the Senate. Superiorite Mary Fruehauf, was first to contact Milroy.

“I am the oldest of three kids, born to my mom and dad, and my dad died when I was a preschooler. My mother remarried when I was 6 years old, and her second husband adopted the three of us.”

After Freuhauf and her siblings were adopted, her biological father’s name was removed from her birth certificate and replaced by the name of her mother’s second husband.

 “They divorced a few years after that, and we have no relationship with him at all, and don’t wish to have one. Every time I’ve needed to use my birth certificate it really bugged me a perfect strangers name is listed as my father on my birth certificate.”

These frustrations led Freuhauf to contact Milroy.  Milroy says that until he heard from Fruehauf he wasn’t aware that adoptees were unable to revert their birth certificates.

 “I have real high hopes we will get this bill passed this year. It’s such an important part of people’s identity and especially for future generations to be able to go and look back at legal documents and know who their ancestors are. I think this is a common sense proposal.”

The bill passed by the State Assembly in October. In the public hearing in the Senate in November, they received a favorable response. It’s expected to be voted on by the senate committee and then will go to the full senate this month.

 “More people will benefit from it than we know a lot more than I think people realize, the American family is so different from the way it was in the 1950s when all of this started.”

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